A very well done, after a difficult weekend to Steve Haley again heading the L4 scores

with John Whittle and Ken Woodhouse following closely behind.

Steve Haley 100

John Whittle 90.147

Ken Woodhouse 89.377

Bob Dickinson 85.361

Paul Carrington 83.004

Clive Needham 78.21

Bill Haley 76.423

Neil Harrison 75.039

Chris Jubb 59.89

Alan Jones 58.059

Simon Haley 32.55

Mike Challinor 0

Mark Passingham 0


Please see below the lighter side of F3B in the UK as put be the world famous BOB (to many stories so little time) This one of a series of report from the UK F3b League. Bob reports have become know as the Three B's of F 3 B or The Fabulous Bob Beery Banter.


Ok – Sunday morning dawned bright and early. Very early. I set off down to Upton on Severn at the crack of dawn, in order to be on site early enough o help set up the course and do my bit. I arrived at approx 8am and was first there. Couldn’t remember the lock combination number, so telephoned Clive, who didn’t answer. Thinks – he’ll be here soon, no worries – 8.30 came along – no Clive. The old gitl’s obviously slept in. Ring Steve Haley. No answer. What’s going on? Fumbling around my phone, I find Alan Jones’ number, ring him. He answers “where are you”! asks I. We’re on the middle field, he replies. At this point I start to wonder.

Which middle field – I ask? At Retford of course. Oh shit! Everyone else has got the venue wrong and I am in the only one in the right place – the choices then become simple.

Option 1 - I fly at Upton and claim the league win
Option 2 - I fly at Upton and post my results as per postal comps.
Option 3 - I drive 170 miles back to Retford to join the other guys who obviously don’t know where they should really be flying.

I decided to take Option 3 and join the Boys. Carefully observing all speed limits, I arrive there at 12 Noon. The course is already set up. The boys – bless ‘em, had re-arranged the early slots so that my first duration hadn’t been flown.

I was therefore able to fly a whole competition – albeit in the wrong place.

I flew alright in the first duration, got screwed in distance, and flew speed crap. I put it down to jet lag.

Clive flew and launched well – finished 4th overall.
Mikey once again was only really beaten by speed.
Alan Jones flew the whole comp showing his improvements all the way – well done Alan.

Ken and Mark both flew well, finishing 3rd and 6th respectively. They both travel a long way to come to the Wetlands, and it is great to see the enthusiasm and skill they bring from their F3F experiences.

What does surprise me, however, is that the F3J flyers is the UK do not take any interest in F3B. This is of course with the exception of 4 or 5 competitive flyers. Mostly they seem to regard F3B as a black out. Perhaps this is my hobby horse but F3J models nowadays are all lighter and larger versions of F3B models. F3B is where the development of the first moulded models, and the first multi function models came from.

Why on earth do not more F3J flyers take part in F3B in order to have their skills and benefit earlier from F3B development so that they can improve their own chances in F3J?

Our continental friends enjoy a far greater crossover between the 2 disciplines. Our continental friends normally beat us.

Does this not trigger any thoughts? Are we all dim?

Love Bob

PS:- one quote from league 3. Mikey was getting ready to fly distance and asked me to time a chat for him. I felt honoured, and said “you really want me to chat distance? The reply was – “there’s no one else available Bob”. Cruel but fair I thought.